grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tip - Beat Boards / StoryboardsIt can be a daunting task to just “start storyboarding”. Because there’s so many things to think about when storyboarding, we all need a roadmap to know where we are going. Beat boards are not even the first step to creating a story, but it’s often the clearest way to pitch an early concept to someone. It’s also very useful to plan out the larger beats of a large physical sequence (action, chase, etc.). This way, you don’t have to go on a limb for a week or two and have to redo it all if it doesn’t work. They’re sort of like your Key Poses in animation, but put on a story scale. Does that make sense? Message me if you have any questions or suggestions about future posts.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tip - Beat Boards / Storyboards

It can be a daunting task to just “start storyboarding”. Because there’s so many things to think about when storyboarding, we all need a roadmap to know where we are going. Beat boards are not even the first step to creating a story, but it’s often the clearest way to pitch an early concept to someone. It’s also very useful to plan out the larger beats of a large physical sequence (action, chase, etc.). This way, you don’t have to go on a limb for a week or two and have to redo it all if it doesn’t work. They’re sort of like your Key Poses in animation, but put on a story scale. Does that make sense? Message me if you have any questions or suggestions about future posts.

Norm

(via deepr)

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - 2 Basic Storyboarding RulesHere’s 2 tips that are so simple it hurts when I forget them. In the process of re-boarding over and over, they can be lost in the shuffle sometimes. Drill these 2 tips into your head!-Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - 2 Basic Storyboarding Rules

Here’s 2 tips that are so simple it hurts when I forget them. In the process of re-boarding over and over, they can be lost in the shuffle sometimes. Drill these 2 tips into your head!

-Norm

10 typical perspective errors

helpyoudraw:

electricalice:

Drawing perspective is considered one of the hardest things in art, except the mistakes usually done are pretty much always the same and can be avoided with a little care.

1. Lines not reaching the vanishing point

image

Well this is pretty simple to avoid but it’s the most common mistake. It’s probably due to either carelessness or really not having understood the basic of perspective. I encourage you to go back and find some basic tutorial for this.

Anyway, be ALWAYS careful about where to ‘send’ your lines, they NEED to go towards the correct vanishing point or it will just look awkward. Double check if necessary.

And always, ALWAYS use a ruler.

If your style requires lines that are a bit less geometrical (as mine do, I have a style of inking that’s sketchy so ‘perfect’ lines drawn with a ruler usually don’t fit well in the picture) use a ruler anyway for the pencils and then ink later by freehand. At least you’ll have correct guidelines underneath.

image

For traditional drawing be sure you have a ruler and be sure to use it for each one of your lines.

Modern drawing software will help you a lot with this if you draw directly on computer: painting software such as Clip Studio Paint or Manga Studio 4EX or 5 have perspective tools that will automatically snap your lines towards the vanishing point.

image

it’s quite a long tutorial, you’ll find the rest under the Read More or you can download the pdf file here

Read More

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

A mouth-watering fuck-ton of hand references.

[From various sources]

(via spx)

helpfulharrie:

!! Woah guys! Pixelovely’s new tools are finally out, one for hands & feet, and one for faces!

There’s now 429 photos of hands & feet, and 314 photos of faces. Dang!!

This is super cool news and I certainly can’t wait to start using them haha

I’ve got tons of tutorials on hands, feet and faces in their relevant tags, so be sure to check those out too nwn

Check out Pixelovely! I usually start my drawing day by warming up with the figure drawing practice sessions.

(via angelcreations)

jimzub:

I originally posted this up originally back in June 2007 on my Livejournal, but all of the advice in it still rings true so I thought I’d re-post it here on my Tumblr as we head into another convention season.

Read on…


I don’t know where I first heard someone say “Everyone at cons not already…

Anonymous asked: I've been in a funk lately regarding my drawings, nothing that I draw is good enough in my mind and its not as fun anymore to draw. I've always been VERY overly critical of my stuff but its getting worse. I try to just look back at my progress but it isn't helping. Do you have any advice? I love your blog by the way it's my favorite!!

tally-art:

For me, this happens OFTEN. Take comfort; I believe it’s a good and necessary part of the cycle artistic progress:

If you see something in your work that never bothered you before, it’s because you’re recognizing it for the first time, which means you can now improve it!  I hope that helps.

raitsui asked: Regarding the Dreamworks program, do you have any tips for resume set up or how to set up portfolios? I recently graduated but it was in studio art, so I don't have any storyboards from my classes - I thought I'd whip some up though! Any tips for people with a pretty shallow resume?

sketchshark:

Hello!! I’m going to answer this one publicly because I’ve received several questions about portfolio/resume recently.

This program is designed for recent graduates/folks with little to no industry experience, so don’t worry if you don’t have a lot on your resume. The thing that will get you the job is not your resume, it’s  the PORTFOLIO. Focus on the boards themselves, because that is what they’re going to be looking at!! DWA is seeking folks whose portfolios show that they have the passion and skills necessary to storyboard at a professional level! Try to make sure you’re submitting feature-style boards (rather than TV…so no arrows, etc.). The portfolio should be 90-95% storyboards/sequential art, with no more than 1-2 pages of design/life drawings (and even those should have some sort of narrative to them! So no 3-hour, super rendered drawings of nekkid people, or watercolor still lifes. Choose short gesture drawings that show character and attitude! Costumed model drawings are great for this).

Hope this helps! And good luck!

A link to DreamWork’s story initiative training program: http://www.dreamworksanimation.com/company/careers/outreach/story

prehistoricfish asked: Hi, I love your art and your beautiful lines. I was just wondering how you get inspiration? do you just draw so much that you can't help it? because recently I feel like everything I draw is so derivative and I can't get anything that's purely from my own mind.

sketchshark:

Hi there!! Trying to get to questions in my inbox, sorry I didn’t see this sooner! Thank you so much for following my work!! Your question was an interesting one! I have a lot of thoughts on the topic, so I apologize in advance for what will probably be a rambly response:

The internet has completely changed things for young artists. Because we have access to so many people’s artwork, a lot of us influence, and are influenced by other artists. This is completely normal and I wouldn’t call this a bad thing (and I am definitely inspired/influenced by many of my friends and talented strangers whose artwork I’ve seen in books or on the internet). As we develop as artists, our tastes continually evolve and so do our styles. I’ve found that I’ve grown the most as an artist when I began to look at my favorite artists’ drawings, my own drawings, and the act of drawing itself with a more analytical eye. (What is it that I like about so-and-so’s work? What are they doing that appeals to me, and what can I learn from them?…What are my weak areas as an artist and what could I work on?)

My approach to drawing has changed a lot in the past couple of years. I once believed growth would come purely from pencil mileage, but I found I wasn’t improving, despite drawing all the time. I found there is a difference between drawing for drawing’s sake, and “productive” drawing. We can sketch things that are within our comfort zones over and over again and not grow any because we continually make the same mistakes. Once I began to tackle my drawing problems and force myself to learn things I didn’t understand, I began to get better. For example, my linework used to be terrible and muddy…I didn’t understand flow/line economy at all and my sketches were stiff..so I forced myself to draw with felt tip pens/ink for two years and not touch a pencil. This resulted in tons of bad drawings, but a lot of growth. Once you become more comfortable with drawing, it becomes more second nature, and is just a means for you to express your ideas, stories, etc.

In regards to the subject matter of your drawings/originality…I say draw what you know, draw what you love, and draw your own point of view and opinions! My friend Anthony Holden (whose work totally inspires me) made this awesome post about this very topic, and he worded (and drew) it much better than I ever could…but to sum it up, go out and experience things and then use those experiences to draw from! I tend to draw a lot of autobiographical stories because these are things that have happened to me that have made some sort of impression on me. I draw merpeople comics because I’m a big marine biology nut, and I also like comedy. And 
I know there are a lot of varying opinions out there on fanart, but I say if you’re a big fan of a movie/show/video game/book, and it inspires you…then show us what it is about that product/character that you love! 

Lastly, you can only worry so much about originality. There are very few 100% original ideas out there in the world, and chances are, if you think of some interesting idea, someone else somewhere out there in this world is probably thinking of it too! It’s good to strive for originality, but know that if you fret about it too much, you’ll be too paralyzed to create anything at all, and that is far worse! My opinion is if you are drawing something that is from an honest and genuine place, you’re doing it right. The more you practice drawing to express your point of view, the more your unique perspective and “style” will start to come out naturally in your drawings.

I have no idea if any of that was remotely helpful, but I hope you got something from it!

Thanks again for following along!

—Megan

Good advice from Megan! 

bankshot:

Sound reminders for more than just animation

(Source: pixarchan, via adrianalikestea)