mintxmint:

barachan:

process images of this piece. only a few of these prints will be available at moon crisis tonight, so come early! ♥

This makes me want to draw more!!! I have to buy a new computer…

mintxmint:

barachan:

process images of this piece. only a few of these prints will be available at moon crisis tonight, so come early! ♥

This makes me want to draw more!!! I have to buy a new computer…

(via shortcuttothestars)

kangarookevin:

nayrosartrefs:

Some awesome leg tutorials done by n3m0s1s.

Because legs are the hardest thing to draw for me. Seriously, I’ll have a character with an awesome upper torso, then spaghetti legs.

(via madithefreckled)

lionheart191 said: How do you get over being over-critical of your own writing? I try, but sometimes I can't even put out a paragraph it's so bad.

kateordie:

neil-gaiman:

joehillsthrills:

I remind myself that no one day of writing matters all that much. A story is built somewhat like a stalactite - one little drip of mud and grit at a time.

I  remind myself that the first few drafts are just for me. That gives me permission to let it be an ungodly mess, full of shit sentences and crap ideas, whipped into a creamy froth with the occasional bits that do work. Later I’ll winnow out the stuff that was no good. What remains will be (I hope) fun, economical, and lively.

It helps (me) to write longhand. I know no one is ever going to see my longhand draft but me. That’s a free pass to suck.

Also, though, I try and work small. If I think a scene blows dead rats, I’ll stop thinking about the big picture, and just think about the next sentence. If I can get down one sentence that really excites me, sometimes it will throw a spark powerful enough to bring a dying moment back to life.

WHAT HE SAID.

I think that may need more emphasis. 

Ahem.

WHAT HE FUCKING SAID.

There.

I’m a writer now

veesdumpingrounds:

part 1 of my answer ! I dunno, I hope this is some help or whatever, or at least a goof startpoint for people to debate over the differences between comics and animation ? :) it’s still a good time for you to go check out my comics wwebsite haha 

(via shaggyshan)

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Life Drawing Exercise: CONTOUR LINEOne of the most straight forward tip I have about Life Drawing. It kind of goes against what most life drawing instructors will tell you. The first thing you’ll hear is “Draw from the inside.” A contour line on a figure drawing is about the most superficial way to approach it BUT, it will help you tremendously at finding a clear silhouette. By the way, no one says you can’t slightly alter the silhouette you are looking at. If there’s a way to make it clearer or make a better statement, go for it. Drawing is about making decisions, not just copying what you’re seeing. The same way other techniques will help understand how the body functions, using a contour line as an exercise will help you find proportions, angles of the body and general appeal in your posing.Normand

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Life Drawing Exercise: CONTOUR LINE

One of the most straight forward tip I have about Life Drawing. It kind of goes against what most life drawing instructors will tell you. The first thing you’ll hear is “Draw from the inside.” A contour line on a figure drawing is about the most superficial way to approach it BUT, it will help you tremendously at finding a clear silhouette. By the way, no one says you can’t slightly alter the silhouette you are looking at. If there’s a way to make it clearer or make a better statement, go for it. Drawing is about making decisions, not just copying what you’re seeing. The same way other techniques will help understand how the body functions, using a contour line as an exercise will help you find proportions, angles of the body and general appeal in your posing.

Normand

(via adrianalikestea)

graphixbooks:

Ready for Amulet 6: Escape From Lucien?! Here’s a sneak peek of one of the scenes from Kazu Kibuishi (boltcity) PLUS an explanation of how each page comes to be!

First Photo - Blue Line:  While many of the pages in Amulet begin with a very rough and scribbly version of the page, this is one of the examples where I let the art direct me where to go with the dialogue and story. I knew I wanted to draw the large panel of the Colossus being prepared for battle, so I went right ahead and began penciling the page with a blue pencil and added dialogue after the drawings were done.  I use a blue line so that when I go to ink the page, I can cancel out the blue color in the computer and leave only the clean black lines on the page.  This process feels a bit like I’m drawing with invisible ink or pencil.

Second Photo - Inked Page:  I call this the “inking” stage, but what I’m really doing here is using a regular graphite pencil and drawing over a large printed copy of the blue line image.  After the page is “inked”, I scan the image into the computer and adjust the contrast of the penciled linework to make it look more like ink.  Using a pencil is not only easier on my hand, but it creates a nice, flowing line that makes the image look a little bit like it’s moving. This is also the stage where most of the dialogue writing occurs.  The font is one that is based on my own hand lettering, and I just type drafts of dialogue on the inked pages until I feel the dialogue works.

 Third Photo - Colors:  Once the inks are scanned into the computer, cleaned up, and adjusted, we add colors digitally.  Working digitally allows us to paint a lot faster and adjust things much easier than if we painted everything on paper or canvas.  We use Adobe Photoshop to achieve a painted look and feel.  This stage is overseen by Jason Caffoe (jcaffoe), who works with me to establish the colors and settings in the books.  On this particular page, I simply gave Jason notes on what kind of setting I wanted to see, and he established the imagery in the background.  After working with me for so many years, Jason has a good sense of what I’m looking to achieve, and nearly always hits the mark.

(via felaxx)

goraina:

graphixbooks:

Sisters by Raina Telgemeier (goraina) comes out next month! Here’s a peek behind-the-scenes at the creative process from Raina herself:

Photo 1: This is what my “writing” looks like! I thumbnail out the whole book, and my editor and I edit the story at this stage.

Photo 2: Next, I type up the script and this gets sent to copyediting. The letterer will pull right from this document at the end of the process.

Photo 3: Then, I move on to pencils! I try to keep the energy from my thumbnails in the drawings.

Photo 4: Lastly, I ink over my pencil lines with a brush and India ink. This is the most fun stage of the process for me.

Photo 5: The inked pages are scanned and then sent off to the colorist and the letterer, and the publisher puts the whole thing together. It’s always magical to see the final product!

Here’s some process (and a little preview!) from my upcoming book, SISTERS! The color work is by Braden Lamb. SISTERS will be in stores August 26th.

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - LINE OF ACTION
The line of action doesn’t necessarily need to be drawn in. As long as you think about it while drawing, your gesture or posing will be stronger. It gives a direction to the pose, a force that runs though, or simply a visual pathways to guide your audience. Use it always!Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - LINE OF ACTION

The line of action doesn’t necessarily need to be drawn in. As long as you think about it while drawing, your gesture or posing will be stronger. It gives a direction to the pose, a force that runs though, or simply a visual pathways to guide your audience. Use it always!

Norm

(via adrianalikestea)

isaia:

gigidigi:


   Hi Gigi! I wanted to ask you a question about colors! I have a problem with choosing colors when there is drastic lighting, whether its really bright light or if the characters are in a really dark, dimly lit place. I’m not sure how to choose the colors that fit the characters (that make them look like they’re themselves, and not different. I hope that makes sense!) So, how do you choose your colors when doing that sort of lighting in your comics?    — waddledoops

I hope this is a little bit helpful!

I’m JUST now getting into Cucumber Quest, and it’s like a whole world of color and light is opening up to me! Thank you, Gigi!

isaia:

gigidigi:

   Hi Gigi! I wanted to ask you a question about colors! I have a problem with choosing colors when there is drastic lighting, whether its really bright light or if the characters are in a really dark, dimly lit place. I’m not sure how to choose the colors that fit the characters (that make them look like they’re themselves, and not different. I hope that makes sense!) So, how do you choose your colors when doing that sort of lighting in your comics?
    — waddledoops

I hope this is a little bit helpful!

I’m JUST now getting into Cucumber Quest, and it’s like a whole world of color and light is opening up to me! Thank you, Gigi!

(via madithefreckled)

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - STRAIGHT against CURVESThis principle really helps to create shapes and characters with “points of interest”. The straights move the eye towards the areas of curves, bumps and details. I mostly focused on the silhouettes of the shapes/characters, but the same principles should also be applied to shapes and volumes inside the main shape/volume.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - STRAIGHT against CURVES

This principle really helps to create shapes and characters with “points of interest”. The straights move the eye towards the areas of curves, bumps and details. I mostly focused on the silhouettes of the shapes/characters, but the same principles should also be applied to shapes and volumes inside the main shape/volume.

Norm

(via animationtidbits)

reaill:

retrogradeworks:

conceptcookie:

Exercise 26: Shading Gems Results
Check out the results of our Shading Gems exercise here along with the explanation to create your own HERE!

I love this tutorial SO MUCH.

AAAAAAAAH!!!!!!

(via upperstories)

grizandnorm:

Tuesday tips — Costume Design 101.

Costume design is a very important part of character design.  It tells you a whole lot about your character; ie. age, personality, what she/he likes, time period, strength, … etc.  It supposed to enhance a character’s personality.  

Here are my process in tackling costume design.

1.  Find a good reference.  Inspiration is key!

2.  Look for a good shillouette that is recognizable and different from other characters.

3.  Pick one shillouette and find smaller shape within.  Do tons of variation and have fun.

4.  Color variation.  Use variation the same color combination for all the design.  Keep it simple!

5.  Finish up and have fun.  It will also a good idea to think of texture and material.

-Griz

(via giancarlovolpe)

jbaxteranimator:

Pencil test time! This is the tied down version of one of the shots I animated for the opening credits of Gravity Falls

(via adrianalikestea)

(Source: hewdel, via chickahdee)